Hi I'm Andy

Pokémon, Game of Thrones, Guns, misc.

North Dakota

 

your-american-average:

elegantempath:

sushinfood:

tastefullyoffensive:

20 Mind-Boggling Shower Thoughts [showerthoughts/distractify]

Previously: Name Improvements for Everyday Stuff

The Crisp one was amazing to me until my Aussie friend spoke up and said AND IT GOES THE OPPOSITE DIRECTION IF YOU SAY PISS RACK.

Fact: it is actually INCREDIBLY difficult to make an earth sandwich as shown here

If Hilary Clinton becomes president I’m leaving.

So a while ago, I posted pictures of a sorry looking SKS with half of the parts missing, looking for a front sight block and a magazine assembly, and finally my quest has come to a close.

I have successfully un-bubba’d and saved this fine weapon.

-Type 56 made in factory 26

So a while ago, I posted pictures of a sorry looking SKS with half of the parts missing, looking for a front sight block and a magazine assembly, and finally my quest has come to a close.

I have successfully un-bubba’d and saved this fine weapon.

-Type 56 made in factory 26

justremington:

Yugoslav M59/66 SKS and UAR Rasheed 

justremington:

Yugoslav M59/66 SKS and UAR Rasheed 

tacticalraven:

Stockpiling alone won’t prepare you for the mayhem of societal collapse.  Train, practice, use your tools over and over again, turn skills into muscle-memory instincts so when you need them, they happen without much thought.  But it’s still advisable to stock supplies for use and barter in the event that you need them.  Here’s my master list of items to keep in my home in the event of a societal interruption.
· water · food (canned, dehydrated, freeze dried) meats, beans, fruits, vegetables, wheat, rice, oats and grains · spices and sweeteners (salt, pepper, sugar, honey, syrup, etc) · cooking oil · coffee and tea · alcohol (grain alcohol, vodka, gin, tequila, scotch) · cigarettes/tobacco/other addictions · vitamins · firestarters (matches, lighters, magnesium and flint, etc) · firewood · heirloom seeds (fruits, vegetables, herbs, spices) · first aid items and medicines (bandages, band aids, peroxide, isopropyl alcohol, allergy medicines, antacids, antibiotics, aspirin, tylenol, eye drops, cotton balls, q-tips, moleskin) · dental care items (toothbrushes/toothpaste/floss) · paper items (toilet paper, paper towels, tissues) · feminine hygiene supplies · soap/shampoo/laundry detergent/bleach/ammonia/sponges/rags · hand sanitizer · sunscreen · insect repellant · containers for storing and transporting water and food · canning jars, lids and rings · can openers · common tools · duct tape · wd-40 · building materials (nails, screws, 2 x 4s, plywood) · chains and locks · sandbags · water filtration supplies · gardening tools and supplies · sewing supplies · fishing supplies · animal traps · fuel (gasoline, propane, kerosene, lamp oil, naphtha, etc) · synthetic oil · bio-hemical hazard gear (masks, respirators, gloves, goggles, chem suits) (stock up on 3m 1860 n95 respirators) · guns, ammo, gun cleaning supplies · knives · archery items · walkie talkies · batteries · blankets · tarps · flashlights · candles · lightbulbs · glow sticks · warm clothing · hats/gloves · bandanas · entertainment (books, cards, board games, paper, pencils, pens)
tacticalraven.tumblr.com

tacticalraven:

Stockpiling alone won’t prepare you for the mayhem of societal collapse.  Train, practice, use your tools over and over again, turn skills into muscle-memory instincts so when you need them, they happen without much thought.  But it’s still advisable to stock supplies for use and barter in the event that you need them.  Here’s my master list of items to keep in my home in the event of a societal interruption.

· water
· food (canned, dehydrated, freeze dried) meats, beans, fruits, vegetables, wheat, rice, oats and grains
· spices and sweeteners (salt, pepper, sugar, honey, syrup, etc)
· cooking oil
· coffee and tea
· alcohol (grain alcohol, vodka, gin, tequila, scotch)
· cigarettes/tobacco/other addictions
· vitamins
· firestarters (matches, lighters, magnesium and flint, etc)
· firewood
· heirloom seeds (fruits, vegetables, herbs, spices)
· first aid items and medicines (bandages, band aids, peroxide, isopropyl alcohol, allergy medicines, antacids, antibiotics, aspirin, tylenol, eye drops, cotton balls, q-tips, moleskin)
· dental care items (toothbrushes/toothpaste/floss)
· paper items (toilet paper, paper towels, tissues)
· feminine hygiene supplies
· soap/shampoo/laundry detergent/bleach/ammonia/sponges/rags
· hand sanitizer
· sunscreen
· insect repellant
· containers for storing and transporting water and food
· canning jars, lids and rings
· can openers
· common tools
· duct tape
· wd-40
· building materials (nails, screws, 2 x 4s, plywood)
· chains and locks
· sandbags
· water filtration supplies
· gardening tools and supplies
· sewing supplies
· fishing supplies
· animal traps
· fuel (gasoline, propane, kerosene, lamp oil, naphtha, etc)
· synthetic oil
· bio-hemical hazard gear (masks, respirators, gloves, goggles, chem suits) (stock up on 3m 1860 n95 respirators)
· guns, ammo, gun cleaning supplies
· knives
· archery items
· walkie talkies
· batteries
· blankets
· tarps
· flashlights
· candles
· lightbulbs
· glow sticks
· warm clothing
· hats/gloves
· bandanas
· entertainment (books, cards, board games, paper, pencils, pens)

tacticalraven.tumblr.com

antigovernmentextremist:

Across America, Police Departments Are Quietly Preparing For War

At first blush, the title of this post could be perceived as somewhat hyperbolic by those who still have an impression of America’s police departments as bastions of safety, designed "to protect and to serve" the population of the "land of the free." However, said impression would be promptly washed away upon reading an article in today’s NYT which citing Pentagon data, reveals that under the Obama administration, “police departments have received tens of thousands of machine guns; nearly 200,000 ammunition magazines; thousands of pieces of camouflage and night-vision equipment; and hundreds of silencers, armored cars and aircraft.”
Which begs the question: just who is America’s police force, and by extension the Obama administration, which is behind this quiet militarization of local police forces with weapons that would normally be seen in a warzone, preparing for war against?

"Weapons of war have no place on our streets." — President Obama referring to the civilian ownership of the AR-15. Speaks volumes that President Obama would call for the renewal of the Assault Weapons Ban at the exact same time that his administration is handing over literal military grade hardware to local police and sheriffs departments.
For more on this disturbing trend I would recommend you check out Radley Balko’s extensive writing  on the topic including his book, Rise of the Warrior Cop: The Militarization of America’s Police Forces.

antigovernmentextremist:

Across America, Police Departments Are Quietly Preparing For War

At first blush, the title of this post could be perceived as somewhat hyperbolic by those who still have an impression of America’s police departments as bastions of safety, designed "to protect and to serve" the population of the "land of the free." However, said impression would be promptly washed away upon reading an article in today’s NYT which citing Pentagon data, reveals that under the Obama administration, “police departments have received tens of thousands of machine guns; nearly 200,000 ammunition magazines; thousands of pieces of camouflage and night-vision equipment; and hundreds of silencers, armored cars and aircraft.

Which begs the question: just who is America’s police force, and by extension the Obama administration, which is behind this quiet militarization of local police forces with weapons that would normally be seen in a warzone, preparing for war against?

"Weapons of war have no place on our streets." — President Obama referring to the civilian ownership of the AR-15. Speaks volumes that President Obama would call for the renewal of the Assault Weapons Ban at the exact same time that his administration is handing over literal military grade hardware to local police and sheriffs departments.

For more on this disturbing trend I would recommend you check out Radley Balko’s extensive writing  on the topic including his book, Rise of the Warrior Cop: The Militarization of America’s Police Forces.

longhunter6:

Some states, like Kansas and Missouri, are strengthening the Second Amendment rights of their citizens. If you do not vote to defend what is yours, than the liberals will surely take all of your freedoms away.

longhunter6:

Some states, like Kansas and Missouri, are strengthening the Second Amendment rights of their citizens. If you do not vote to defend what is yours, than the liberals will surely take all of your freedoms away.

(Source: budgetgunblr)

historicalfirearms:

Cutaway of the Day: M1 Carbine

In 1938 the US Army’s Chief of Infantry Major General George Arthur Lynch requested the US Ordnance Department select and adopt a new ‘light rifle’ or carbine to arm support troops.  The Ordnance Department eventually organised a competition calling for a new carbine design in October 1940.  A number of companies including Reising, Savage, Hyde-BendixWoodhall, Colt and Auto-Ordnance as well as a simple design by John Garand

Beginning in May 1941, the Light Rifle trials weeded out several of the more complicated carbines but were impressed with Garand’s carbine, however they requested that the 45 degree position of the rifle’s magazine be altered.  In doing so Garand was forced to alter his design and the resulting rifle was less reliable than the first prototype offered.   As a result the trials failed to find an adequate design among the submissions. One of the major companies not to submit a design during the first round of testing was Winchester, who were concentrating on .30-06 battle rifle designs.  

Garand’s first .30 Carbine Light Rifle prototype, note the top mounted magazine (source)

The Ordnance Department believed that the M2 Rifle which Winchester had developed might be adapted to chamber the .30 Carbine cartridge. The resulting carbine prepared by Edwin Pugsley and a team of Winchester engineers was based on Ed Browning’s original M2 Rifle design with David Marshall Williams’ short-stroke gas piston and the M1 Garand’s rotating bolt and operating slide.  At 36 inches long and weighing 2.4kg unloaded the rifle fired from a 15-round detachable magazine.  Its elegant stock shape, rapid fire, minimal recoil and hardiness made it a popular rifle, especially among troops fighting in the jungles of the Pacific theatre.

The brilliantly illustrated contemporary diagrams above appeared in a series of instructional charts produced for the US Army by the Ordnance Department.  These training illustrations show how to load and cock the carbine as well as how the rifle’s action works.   Once fired gas is tapped from a gas port this gas pushed the short-stroke piston sharply rearwards.  This drives the operating slide back unlocking the bolt, opening the breech and ejecting the spent case.  The return spring, housed above the trigger group, then pushes the bolt back into battery taking up a new round and the operating rod back into contact with the piston.  

The Winchester carbine was adopted in October 1941, just a month before the US’ entry into the war.  Once the war began production was spread among over a dozen companies including among others: General Motors, the National Postal Meter Company, Rock-Ola, the Quality Hardware & Machine Company, International Business Machines Corp (IBM) and the Rochester Defense Corporation.  The first carbines were delivered to troops fighting in the European Theatre in 1942, initially issued to support troops.  However, as more of the rifles arrived they were increasingly issued to officers and squad leaders.  While on the whole the rifle is said to have performed well it did suffer failures in cold conditions with reports of this occurring during both the Korean War and World War Two.  

By the end of the Second World War a select-fire version of the carbine had been developed.  The M2 would see widespread use during the Korean War and again in Vietnam.  In this fully automatic incarnation the .30 Carbine round provided range and accuracy that submachine guns. like the Thompson and the M3 could not.

Over six million carbines were produced and the M1 remained in US Inventory until the early 1970s, many M1s and M2s were given to South Vietnam while many others remained with reserve units.  The M1’s .30 Carbine cartridge is one of the Second World War’s most widely adopted intermediate cartridges positioned between the heavy hitting .30-06 and the .45ACP.

Source:

Instructional Chart Images

Image Two Source

Military Small Arms of the 2oth Century, I.V. Hogg & J. Weeks, (1985)

amuseoffirebane:

rileylaroux:

darthhermitcrab:

frostygears:


happyhippyspookydrift:


Military Sign Language


YES, this is very relevant to my interests…


HUGE pet peeve of mine, I see it a lot in TV shows. The troops are walking quietly toward their objective. The leader holds up his hand in the halt signal and then
“THE ENEMIES ARE OVER THERE GUISE”
NO
The whole point of these hand signals is to be silent so the close range enemies you’re about to engage DON’T HEAR YOU GIVING COMMANDS
though why I’m still expecting sense out of tv shows I don’t even know



oH MY GOD

amuseoffirebane:

rileylaroux:

darthhermitcrab:

frostygears:

happyhippyspookydrift:

Military Sign Language

YES, this is very relevant to my interests…

HUGE pet peeve of mine, I see it a lot in TV shows. The troops are walking quietly toward their objective. The leader holds up his hand in the halt signal and then

“THE ENEMIES ARE OVER THERE GUISE”

NO

The whole point of these hand signals is to be silent so the close range enemies you’re about to engage DON’T HEAR YOU GIVING COMMANDS

though why I’m still expecting sense out of tv shows I don’t even know

oH MY GOD

(Source: wind-wave)

kingchiggy:

Artist: Simon Gangl

This guy’s art is amazing!  I may post more of it here soon just because it is quite well done.  That Exeggutor….wow!